Stitch Lab Blog

Just popping by to show off the Tiny Owl Knits Forest and Frill shrug I just pinned to the blocking boards. Next up: crochet!

Just popping by to show off the Tiny Owl Knits Forest and Frill shrug I just pinned to the blocking boards. Next up: crochet!

I just wanted to share these super cute photos of my nephew Luke in action on his quilt that I made for him!  I finished this quilt very early in the year and had plans on sending it to him in March (when he was born).  He doesn’t seam to mind getting it a little late! I really love seeing photos of things I’ve made for people in use (especially when it’s babies!)

Looking for a tried and true vintage sewing machine? I’ve got several models available to fit your need! Whether you are looking for a starter machine or a super hot rod work horse, I’d love to help you find a great machine! All machines have been fully serviced from top to bottom!
Check out the current models at FixTheStitchuation.com
xo, Hayley

Looking for a tried and true vintage sewing machine? I’ve got several models available to fit your need! Whether you are looking for a starter machine or a super hot rod work horse, I’d love to help you find a great machine! All machines have been fully serviced from top to bottom!

Check out the current models at FixTheStitchuation.com

xo, Hayley

Who wears short shorts?  Tina Sparkles wears short shorts!  I’ve been working on the pattern for these shorts over the last month or so and it has become somewhat of a joke around the Stitch Lab because I’ve made like a million test pairs before getting the pattern right.  I always tell my pattern-making students to make tests of their garments before using their good fabric.  Since flat pattern-making is an experimental art that takes something from 2D to 3D, more often than not, you have to tweak things here and there before it turns out how you want.  I didn’t think it would take as many tests as it did for these shorts!  You can’t really see the details super well in this photo, but the shorts have a yoke, pleats, waistband, pockets and a faced hem.  I messed around with several variations on the volume of the pleats, the number of pleats, the angle of the pleats, the shape of the yoke and also the shape of the hem until……finally!  I just love how they turned out!

Who wears short shorts?  Tina Sparkles wears short shorts!  I’ve been working on the pattern for these shorts over the last month or so and it has become somewhat of a joke around the Stitch Lab because I’ve made like a million test pairs before getting the pattern right.  I always tell my pattern-making students to make tests of their garments before using their good fabric.  Since flat pattern-making is an experimental art that takes something from 2D to 3D, more often than not, you have to tweak things here and there before it turns out how you want.  I didn’t think it would take as many tests as it did for these shorts!  You can’t really see the details super well in this photo, but the shorts have a yoke, pleats, waistband, pockets and a faced hem.  I messed around with several variations on the volume of the pleats, the number of pleats, the angle of the pleats, the shape of the yoke and also the shape of the hem until……finally!  I just love how they turned out!

Let’s play with FABRIC letters!!!

Kids love playing with Jumbo Fabric Letters! 

Here’s what you’ll need:

Felt or fabric

Fabric marker

Poly-fil Stuffing

Hand sewing needle and thread

Sewing machine

Quilting ruler

Scissors or Rotary Cutter

Cutting mat if using rotary cutter and ruler

Pinking shears (if using fabric that can fray)

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1.) Draw your letter on your felt or fabric 

You can either sketch out your own letters or shapes OR you can print out templates. Either way, make certain they are large enough for you to be able to stuff them after sewing them together. I am going to show you the letter “V” and “B”. The “V” is pretty simple, but the “B” has more curves, so can be a little more challenging. 

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2.) Cut out your letter. Be sure to double up on your fabric so you have 2 letters. (Please be mindful of  right and wrong sides if using fabric) Remember to cut out the smaller circles of letters that have them. These will get sewn, also.

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3.) Place both of your letter or shape pieces on top of each other facing the correct way in preparation for sewing.image

4.) Set your machine to a zig zag stitch

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5.) Mark a 2-3” opening to allow for stuffing.

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6.) Sew all around making sure to backstitch at each start and stop point. Also, remember to sew those little “d” shapes on the inside of the “B” shut.

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7.) Start stuffing the letter, you may need to use something to get the stuffing into small and tight places.  (I just used my fabric marker)

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8.) Hand sew the small opening closed! And you’re done!image

TA-DA!

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Knit (with crochet) Along: The Tiny Owl Knits Forest and Frill Shrug, Part 3

Kristen here, with a progress report on my shrug:

This is the swatch I tried first. It’s two different colors held together of Beaverslide worsted weight yarn (in colors Mule Deer and Mink Heather).

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This is a shrug in progress using Native Twist from Imperial Stock Ranch in the colorway Teal Heather.

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I began swatching for this project with two yarns I liked together, but quickly changed directions, as you can see. My swatch has 20 stitches cast on using one strand each of the Beaverslide worsted weight yarn (one of my all time favorites) on size 11 needles. I’m a pretty loose knitter, which I already knew, so I usually start out with a needle a size or two smaller than what is suggested by the designer. The two worsted yarns together should pretty closely replicate the final size and gauge of the yarn originally used by the designer. In fact, my gauge was pretty spot on with the Beaverslide.

However, the more I worked on the swatch, the less sure I was that I liked the way the fabric looks. So I dug around in my stash and found the Native Twist. It’s a nice fluffy, plump single-ply teal yarn with flecks of pinkish purple. The color is difficult to photograph and very vibrant. I quickly worked through about a skein and a half so far. I love this yarn, and it plays well with cables.

I had another look at the original swatch in Beaverslide today, and the combo may have grown on me, which won’t surprise anybody who knows me. Next time you hear from me, I may have changed my mind yet again.

Looking for a tried and true vintage sewing machine? I’ve got several models available to fit your need! Whether you are looking for a starter machine or a super hot rod work horse, I’d love to help you find a great machine! All machines have been fully serviced from top to bottom!
Check out the current models at FixTheStitchuation.com
xo, Hayley

Looking for a tried and true vintage sewing machine? I’ve got several models available to fit your need! Whether you are looking for a starter machine or a super hot rod work horse, I’d love to help you find a great machine! All machines have been fully serviced from top to bottom!

Check out the current models at FixTheStitchuation.com

xo, Hayley

Knit (with crochet) Along: The Tiny Owl Knits Forest and Frill Shrug, Part 2

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Liz here!  I’ve chosen my yarn for the main body of the forest & frill shrug.  The crochet edges use a different yarn, we’ve decided to finish our knitting first.  The main yarn I’ve chosen is a Beaverslide 100% Merino 3-Ply McTaggart Tweed in Mittens Lake color.  I’m a big fan of wool in general, and as a new knitter I am really interested in how much control in color and texture is available.  I’m in love with this yarn and I’m already thinking of other projects it would suit!

I’ve completed my first swatch and I’ve opted to use a single heavier yarn instead of a doubling.  My swatch is pretty close to gauge and my cables actually look pretty darn good!  Keep on the look out for a little cable tutorial we are putting together next.  The only change to the pattern so far was Kristen suggested using 4 knit stitches at the beginning and end of each row instead of 2.  This gives some added stability and a little more of an edge to work with when stitching to it.  

Stay tuned & thanks for Stitching with us!!

frugalkrugal:

Just made this bird cross cross back tank for a super beautiful woman! @hhhardcoeur #stitchlab #echino

This is the same pattern I made about 5 or 6 times last summer!  As seen here!

frugalkrugal:

Just made this bird cross cross back tank for a super beautiful woman! @hhhardcoeur #stitchlab #echino

This is the same pattern I made about 5 or 6 times last summer!  As seen here!